Student Affairs

Dialogues On Diversity

Type of Exhibitor / Vendor:

  • Multicultural
  • Orientation
  • Speakers Bureau
  • Training
  • Comedian

Dialogues on Diversity Cambridge , MA 02138
617-828-7491

Ron Jones ron@dialoguesondiversity.comhttp://dialoguesondiversity.com/

Description

Dialogues on Diversity uses theatrical models to promote conversation and understanding around cultural sensitivity, bias and social justice. Our programming is award-winning, highly praised and has been profiled by major media outlets, including CNN, Washington Post and Rueters.

Tailoring our programming for college, university, corporate and community audiences, DOD offers a range of fun, interactive, and informative programs designed to educate and entertain. We believe that diversity is a discipline just like many other complex forms of learning, yet we often assume that we automatically come to the table with all the tools and skills we need to engage difference. If we are to move into the fast changing new century with any sense of direction, we must begin to embrace a new sense of cultural commonality and curiosity; from that we will build a new paradigm of cultural competence. Once we do this, differences become an opportunity, not an obstacle.

Our Programming:

“The Black-Jew Dialogues"- Multiple time winner of APCA and NACA's best cultural/diversity programming award. This program is the cornerstone of the Dialogues on Diversity's cultural awareness and diversity programming, modeling cross-generational as well as cross-cultural dialogue. The goal of the "Black-Jew Dialogues" is to promote open, honest, and respectful conversation about our differences and move audiences to action.

"Get Out Of Your Bubble!"- Using a game show format GGOYB gives students a whole new way to look at difference. This orientation program inspires students to see college for the great adventure that it can be. We Start With A Question…”Why SHOULD you go to college?” "Get Out Of Your Bubble!" shows students how taking advantage of all of the resources offered at their institution will make them more knowledgeable, diverse, and marketable in a far more competitive world.

"The Movement: 50 Years of Love and Struggle"- 1 actor, 10 characters, 50 years of social justice. This visual chronicle highlights many of the political, social, cultural markers of the more than 50 years since the passage of The Voting Rights Act of 1965. Supported by interactive video, stock historical footage, quotes and some of the most memorable music of the last two generations; “The Movement” weaves the tapestry of struggle and triumph which made for the fastest cultural expansion of any group in American history.

Dialogues on Diversity Workshops- Provides high-energy and informative diversity training tools that empower students and staff to maximize their human resource potential by developing a greater understanding of the wealth of opportunity to be found in difference. We accomplish this through fun and highly interactive, evidence based workshops, lectures, and keynote addresses, which focus on intercultural and multicultural awareness.

Please visit our website to learn more about these and our other programs.

Servicing:

  • Region I (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT)
  • Region II (DC, DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA, WV)
  • Region III (AL, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX, VA)
  • Region IV-E (IA, IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI)
  • Region IV-W (AR, CO, KS, MO, ND, NE, NM, OK, SD, WY)
  • Region V (AK, ID, MT, NV, OR, UT, WA)
  • Region VI (AZ, CA, HI)

Photos:

Videos:

Contact

For booking info please contact Ron Jones at Ron@dialoguesondiversity.com or by phone at 617-828-7491

It was easily the best program we have done all year! They made it easy to connect with other campus groups and have a discussion that we have needed to have.

--Ruth Kerman Program Director at San Diego State, University Hillel

I still have students asking me if we are bringing back that wild show, where that one actor plays all the parts, including the KKK member, the 1960s Black Power follower, the janitor who is speaking to his new born baby, and the man who is being priced out of his home because of gentrification. My answer, again, this year, is yes!

--Zachary S. Ritter, PhD Associate Director of Campus Diversity and Inclusion University of Redlands

The Dialogues on Diversity workshop provided a fun and safe way to engage and facilitate discussions on diversity, discrimination, and identity. The games allowed us to start the conversation in a way that was both non-threatening and thought-provoking.

--–Jasmyne Rogers Residence Hall Director, Gresham Complex & Foundation House Office of Housing and Residence Life, Old Dominion University

After the DOD workshop I know my students left the space energized, motivated and better equipped to wrestle with the multifaceted issues of diversity inclusion on our campus

-Willie “CJ” Harmon, Program Advisor South Dakota State University

One of the greater services this production provides is placing historical words back in the mouths of those who said them. I repeatedly felt the hairs rise on the back of my neck as President Johnson admitted the starkest of home truths, Stokely Carmichael exhorted Black Power in Berkeley in 1966, and King indicted a nation wedded to warfare in an excerpt from his 1967 speech, "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence."

-- Byron Woods, Indy Week

On behalf of the Center for Student Involvement, Women’s Center and the Ramapo community – we really appreciate you coming and sharing your knowledge, expertise, wit and humor with us. The students really enjoyed your presentation and I was pleased with their level of engagement. This presentation planted the seed in getting them to appreciate difference and understand diversity at all levels.

--Tanadjza Robinson-McCray, M.S. Coordinator for Equity and Diversity Programs Ramapo College of NJ

Brave theatre that opens people up to the possibility of change.

--John H. Houchin Boston College, Chair, Theatre Department

The conversation and the assembly created the opportunity for discussions on race and racial issues in our school community that we had not been able to do on our own.

--Dr. Beth Singer Principal, Northampton High School